Tag Archives: Walmart

A More Dangerous And Demanding Future For Retail Employees?

Today’s post comes from guest author Jon Rehm, from Rehm, Bennett & Moore.

Walmart announced last week that it started a pilot program where store employees will deliver packages from stores on their way home from work. If this practice is adopted company wide and adopted by the retail industry as a whole, it will change the nature of retail employment.

As written about on this blog before, delivery and warehousing jobs tend to have more physical injures than traditional retail clerk jobs. If employee delivery becomes a regular part of retail employment, then retail jobs should become more hazardous. One positive part about Walmart using employees to make deliveries would be the fact that those employees should be covered by workers’ compensation if they are injured while delivering packages. Fed Ex has faced legal challenges for misclassifying their delivery drivers as independent contractors. Uber, who has also faced challenges on how they classify their drivers, also has a package delivery service.

Delivery jobs tend to be more physically demanding than retail clerk jobs and can also subject employees to DOT requirements. If package delivery becomes an expected part of retail employment, retail jobs will have more physical and occupational requirements. This could mean in the future that retail jobs may not be a fallback option for workers from other physically demanding occupations who become unable to do their old jobs because of injuries or health problems.

The rise of online shopping has greatly reduced the number of stores of traditional retailers. This decline in so-called “big box” stores lead to a parallel reduction in retail employment. Jamelle Bouie pointed out in Slate that this collapse in retail employment has harmed women, people of color and urbanites who tend to work in retail. Bouie points out, I think correctly, that retail employees tend to be disrespected in part because of gender and race. Bouie also states the decline in retail employment has received much less attention than declines in employment in other sectors like manufacturing and mining that tend to employ more white males.

In contrast to traditional retail workers, delivery drivers tend to be paid better. UPS delivery drivers seem to enjoy a certain level of prestige, respect and even a mystique within the workforce. (11) Maybe some of that respect will rub-off on retail workers if they become delivery employees.  On the flip slide, competition from largely non-unionized and lower-paid retail workers may cut into pay and benefits that delivery drivers and their unions have fought for over the years.

1,00 Walmart, J.C. Penney, And The Children’s Place Employees Dead After Building Collapse

Today’s post comes from guest author Leonard Jernigan, from The Jernigan Law Firm.

On April 24, 2013, an eight-story factory, known as The Rana Plaza, in Bangladesh came tumbling down killing 1,100 workers and leaving 2,500 injured. This number includes workers and their children that were in the onsite nursery at the time the building collapsed. The most disturbing part is that the employers knew that the building was unsafe before it collapsed. In fact, the day before the accident, the building was evacuated due to structural cracks that could be seen throughout the building. The next day workers were ordered to return to work as usual.

In a complaint filed July 21, 2015 family members of some of the employees who were killed claim that the building’s owner failed to comply with the building codes that could have prevented the deaths of so many innocent workers. The plaintiffs in the suit are seeking compensatory and punitive damages for negligence and wrongful death.

The plaintiffs claim that the reason that the retailers could supply “garments at such a low cost was because the subcontractors often operated substandard and unsafe factories which put garment workers at significant risk of severe personal injury or death.” A few of the U.S. based employers that were located in this building are Wal-mart, The Children’s Place and J.C. Penney.

Read more here: http://www.courthousenews.com/2015/07/24/retailers-sued-over-2013-building-collapse.htm

Original Article posted on WorkersCompensation.com.