Tag Archives: 2015

Increase in Work-Related Fatal Injuries in 2015 – North Dakota the Highest

Today’s post comes from guest author Anthony L. Lucas, from The Jernigan Law Firm.

According to the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, in 2015 the number of work-related fatal injuries increased nationally. There were 4,836 work-related fatal injuries in the United States and 150 work-related fatal injuries in North Carolina compared to 4,821 in 2014.

After the oil-and-gas industry’s sharp increase in work-related fatal injuries in 2014, the industry saw a 38 percent drop in 2015. The occupation with the most reported work-related fatal injuries was “heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers” with 745. However, logging workers had the highest work-related fatal injury rate at 132.7 per 100,000 workers.

North Dakota reported the highest work-related fatal injury rate at 12.5 per 100,000 workers and Rhode Island recorded the lowest rate at 1.2 per 100,000 workers. North Carolina’s 2015 work-related fatal injury rate was 3.4 per 100,000 workers, with a total of 150 fatalities. In 2014, North Carolina had 137 work-related fatal injuries.

 

2015 Fatal Occupational Injuries Counts and Rates by State of Incident

 

Count

Rate per 100,000 Workers

Alabama

70

3.7

Alaska

14

4.1

Arizona

69

2.4

Arkansas

74

5.8

California

388

2.2

Colorado

75

2.9

Connecticut

44

2.6

Delaware

8

1.9

District of Columbia

8

2.4

Florida

272

3.1

Georgia

180

4.3

Hawaii

18

2.6

Idaho

36

4.8

Illinois

172

2.9

Indiana

115

3.9

Iowa

60

3.9

Kansas

60

4.4

Kentucky

99

5.5

Louisiana

112

5.8

Maine

15

2.5

Maryland

69

2.4

Massachusetts

69

2.1

Michigan

134

3.1

Minnesota

74

2.7

Mississippi

77

6.8

Missouri

117

4.3

Montana

36

7.5

Nebraska

50

5.4

Nevada

44

3.5

New Hampshire

18

2.7

New Jersey

97

2.3

New Mexico

35

4.1

New York

236

2.7

North Carolina

150

3.4

North Dakota

47

12.5

Ohio

202

3.9

Oklahoma

91

5.5

Oregon

44

2.6

Pennsylvania

173

3.0

Rhode Island

6

1.2

South Carolina

117

5.6

South Dakota

21

4.9

Tennessee

112

3.7

Texas

527

4.5

Utah

42

3.2

Vermont

9

2.9

Virginia

106

2.8

Washington

70

2.1

West Virginia

35

5.0

Wisconsin

104

3.6

Wyoming

34

12.0

 

 

 

Total

4,836

3.4

 

 

Employer Fraud in Workers’ Compensation

Today’s post comes from guest author Thomas Domer, from The Domer Law Firm.

Legislatures around the country (including ours in Wisconsin) seem to be preoccupied with employee fraud in workers’ compensation, despite overwhelming evidence that employee fraud is virtually nonexistent. 

Employer fraud, however, continues to plague the industry.  Over the last decade, my friend and colleague Len Jernigan has published a Top 10 Workers’ Comp Fraud Claims.  The list from 2015 can be found at this link.

None of the Top Ten includes only an injured worker.  The top six of the Top Ten stem from California claims.  Others are from New York, Washington, Utah, and Massachusetts. 

This year’s dollar amounts were particularly substantial, with nearly $850 million in total frauds, the largest being a $580 million kickback scheme out of California.  The California kickback scheme involved surgeons and the owner of a hospital.  The other California claims included FedEx mislabeling their drivers as Independent Contractors in order to avoid insurance, and the owners of a translation service fraudulently billing the workers’ compensation system.  Additional mislabeling involved California truck drivers from Pacer Cartage, which owed over $2 million to seven truckers, due to unlawful payroll deductions and misclassifications as Independent Contractors.

The single case involving a worker is a professional football player from the New York Giants who colluded with a claims adjuster, providing fictitious invoices and statements for more than $1.5 million.  The New York, Washington, and Utah claims also involved misclassification in which no workers’ compensation insurance was paid for actual employees.

Another popular theme is the under-reporting of earners in order to be granted lower insurance premiums.  That scheme was uncovered in Massachusetts, avoiding more than a half million dollars in insurance premiums.

The workers’ compensation insurance industry has done a marvelous job in diverting attention from the real culprits (employers, medical providers, and insurers) to the very rare, but sometimes spectacular claims involving employee fraud.  (A worker claiming permanent and total disability climbing around on rocks is far sexier than a financial officer mischaracterizing his employees in a closed office.)