Category Archives: CDC

Opioid Task Force, Recent Studies, and CDC Opioid Recommendations

Today’s post comes from guest author Kristina Brown Thompson, from The Jernigan Law Firm.

The North Carolina Industrial Commission recently joined many other states (i.e. Massachusetts) in tackling the issue of opioids in the workers’ compensation cases by creating a Workers’ Compensation Opioid Task Force. The goal of the task force is to “study and recommend solutions for the problems arising from the intersection of the opioid epidemic and related issues in workers’ compensation claims.” According to the Chair, “[o]pioid misuse and addiction are a major public health crisis in this state.” 

As of last June, a study by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) noted “noticeable decreases in the amount of opioids prescribed per workers’ compensation claim.” From 2012 – 2014, “the amount of opioids received by injured workers decreased.” In particular, there were “significant reductions in the range of 20 to 31 percent” in Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Texas. 

Additionally last March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new recommendations for prescribing opioid medications for chronic pain “in response to an epidemic of prescription opioid overdose, which CDC says has been fueled by a quadrupling of sales of opioids since 1999.” 

Currently, the CDC’s recommendations for prescribing opioids for chronic pain outside of active cancer, palliative, and end-of-life care will likely follow these steps:

1.  Non-medication therapy / non-opioid will be preferred for chronic pain.

2.  Before starting opioid therapy for chronic pain, clinicians should establish treatment goals and consider how therapy will be discontinued if benefits do not outweigh risks.

3.  Before starting and periodically during opioid therapy, clinicians should discuss with patients known risks and realistic benefits of opioid therapy. 

Job Stress Linked To: Weight Gain, Hypertension & Hormone Imbalance

Today’s post comes from guest author Rod Rehm, from Rehm, Bennett & Moore.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NIOSH Research Rounds – Volume 1, Issue 10, April 2016, is the link where the article featured in today’s blog post came from, via Jon Gelman’s Twitter feed. Mr. Gelman, of Jon L. Gelman, L.L.C., is a respected advocate for injured workers in New Jersey, and I thank him for sharing this resource.

When you think about your job, what are the words that come to mind? How do you describe your job and how it makes you feel?

The notion of stress means many different things in different contexts. Sustaining a work-related injury and navigating through a state’s workers’ compensation system is one kind of stress that our employees help clients with every day. As you can see below, another kind of stress has to do with job fit, and that “can lead to poor health and even injury.”

“Job stress refers to the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker,” according to the article. “One form of stress under investigation at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is job strain, which occurs when high job demands combine with low job control.”

There are good links to different research abstracts that were featured in this article, so I’d encourage people to consider each one.

When it comes to job stress and job strain, I hope that employers consider how they can make such occupations as truck driving and nursing less challenging for workers. In addition, I hope that workers can, within the limits of their job descriptions and work schedules, digest the information and think about how to reduce job stress and job strain to both prevent injury and increase overall health.

Have a safe, productive week. Please contact an experienced workers’ compensation lawyer for specific questions, whether you or a loved one has been injured at work, regardless of how the injury occurred.