Tag Archives: retirement

boomers-working-past-retirement

Aging “Baby Boomers” and Workers’ Compensation (Part 2)

baby boomers at workLast week, we brought you Part 1 of a post from our colleague Tom Domer of Wisconsin about some of the NCCI’s interesting conclusions about the implications of “Baby Boomers” in the workplace. In today’s post, we bring you part 2, which discussed these conclusions in more detail.

The frequency of injury has steadily declined since the mid-1990s, with age group differences in frequency largely eliminated.  The decline in frequency has occurred for all age groups.  The differences among age groups in the early 1990s had almost completely disappeared by 2010.

A longstanding worker’s compensation maxim that “younger workers have much higher injury rates” is no longer true.  For example: the injury rate for workers age 55-64 was 16% lower than the frequency for all workers in the mid-1990s but actually 1% higher in 2010, indicating that the differences have clearly narrowed.

Lastly, in terms of severity of claims, older workers certainly cost more, primarily due to higher wages and increased medical costs for older workers.  The severity of medical costs Continue reading

Taxes

Do I Need To File A Tax Return On My Workers Compensation?

If you received workers’ compensation benefits in 2011, you may be wondering if you will need to report this money to the IRS and pay taxes on it. Under the Iowa Workers’ Compensation Act, money that you receive as workers’ compensation benefits is not taxable, with a few exceptions.

You will have to pay taxes on your work comp benefits if:

  • if the benefits are retirement plan benefits (this is true even if you retired due to disability)
  • if part of your workers’ compensation benefit money lowers the amount you receive from your Social Security or Railroad Retirement Benefits. In that case, that the part of your workers compensation benefits is considered part of your Social Security (or RRB) and may be taxable.

If you return to work, your salary will be taxable again, as is it was before you received workers’ compensation benefits.