Category Archives: Legislation

iStock_000000585253Small.jpg

URGENT: Let’s Keep Wisconsin’s Worker’s Compensation System the Best in the Nation!

Today’s post comes from guest author Charlie Domer, from The Domer Law Firm.

Wisconsin’s worker’s compensation system—established in 1911 and part of the “Wisconsin Idea” in politics—has been in place longer than any other in the country and is the envy of other states. The Governor’s Budget Bill (2015 SB 21) proposes major changes to the structure and substance of Wisconsin’s nationally-recognized worker’s compensation system. The proposal would remove the Worker’s Compensation Division from the Department of Workforce Development and then split up previously integrated components, with the adjudicatory functions (administrative law Judges) moving to the Office of Hearings and Appeals (in DOA) and the regulatory, customer service, and claims management functions going to the Office of the Commissioner of Insurance.  Among other significant changes, Judges would be reduced to solely adjudicatory functions, no longer assisting with the law’s administration, and then cross-trained for other legal areas.  The proposals also eliminate the requirement that compromise agreements be approved by ALJs.  The proposed changes could have a hugely negative impact on Wisconsin:

1) Destabilizing effect on insurance carriers, employers, and taxpayers:

Worker’s compensation insurance is a major industry and employer in our state. Total premiums collected for worker’s compensation insurance were approximately 1.75 billion dollars in 2013.  The system as a whole works well for all stakeholders.  Workers generally receive timely benefits with excellent return to work rates.  The system cost to employers is low, as employer premiums have been very stable (rising less than 2.35% on average in the past six years; less than inflation).  Worker’s compensation insurance companies like to do business in our state because of the system’s stability and the corresponding ability to earn profits.  Indeed, at the end of 2014, almost 300 insurance companies writing and competing for worker’s compensation insurance business here.

The worker’s compensation advisory council assists with the system’s stability.  The council is comprised of representatives of labor, management, and the insurance industry, as well as medical provider liaisons.  The council’s agreed-upon changes to the worker’s compensation law, which historically were approved by the legislature, allowed for continual effectiveness and efficiency. 

 The current budget proposal had no input from the advisory council or stakeholders. If the bill passes, the advisory council process is likely over.  Without the council’s steadying process, Wisconsin could face substantial swings in its worker’s compensation law.  Fluctuations in the law will have an immediate impact on the bottom line for insurers, employers, and medical providers. Insurance companies could avoid our state. Employers could face large swings and spikes in premium rate.  Medical providers could see negative impacts on reimbursement rates.

 2) Governmental overreach on a system supported by private business: 

The current Worker’s Compensation Division (at DWD) is not funded by taxpayers; virtually the entire system is funded by assessments from worker’s compensation insurers and self-insured employers.  Thus, private businesses fund the Division, including payment for judges, staff, IT costs, rent, etc.  Along with its payments and the advisory council process, the insurance industry has helped shape the law into its current efficient form.

The Budget Bill suggests that the government has a better handle on the system than those private industries that craft and support it.  The bill proposes no changes in the funding of the system—thus, the worker’s compensation insurance industry will be paying for a soon-to-be inefficient and greater litigious system.  Presumably, the worker’s compensation insurance industry wants to fund staff and judges that have expertise in worker’s compensation—not those “cross-trained” in other areas.  The industry should favor a coherent, integrated system for administering their claims.

Additionally, with a current system that uses virtually 0% taxpayer dollars, the Budget Bill proposal creates an increase in taxpayer costs.  The cost of a “simple” physical move of personnel has to come from somewhere.  There is a huge IT cost—likely in the millions—based on the current system and software of the worker’s compensation division.

3) Less efficiency = Increased claim costs = Increased premiums:

Based on independent studies, Wisconsin workers are paid more quickly and return to work sooner than virtually any other state.  Wisconsin is in the top 10 for lowest cost per worker’s compensation claim.  Wisconsin also has one of the lowest amounts of litigated injuries in the country—with almost 85% of cases resolved without dispute or attorney involvement.  The studies indicate that credit for these positive outcomes is from the efficient administrative process and personnel at the current Division, who actively monitor claims and promote timely reporting and administrative resolution of disputes and concerns. For example, a Judge currently can hold an informal telephone conversation between an injured worker and an insurance company adjuster to resolve a dispute about the appropriate legal payment.

The current proposal is to split up this efficient administrative structure without any rational basis.  The Judges would be spun off into an entirely new agency and separated from the other division personnel.  Private settlements could occur without the valuable Judge oversight and protection.  The efficiency of the administrative system is lost by splitting up the division, and increased litigation is a guarantee.  (As an example, if I want to buy a hot dog, it seems blatantly inefficient to require purchase of hot dog in one place and then the bun in another). 

Without division assistance or oversight, workers will seek counsel.  Litigation will occur over previously-resolvable issues.  Attorneys will litigate the validity of the private settlements.  Increased litigation means increased claims costs, which means increased premiums for employers.  The volume of increased litigation also could force the need for more employees at the new agencies.

 We should maintain our place at the pinnacle of worker’s compensation systems and not look to poor analogies suggested from other states like Florida (comp law declared unconstitutional) or Texas (an opt out system, bringing in the possibility of civil litigation).  The administration’s citation to Illinois’ structure is misplaced as Illinois arbitrators/judges are directly part of the state’s worker’s compensation state agency.

4)  Negative impact on medical providers:

Medical cost payment is currently 2/3 of all payouts in worker’s compensation claims (in 2012, medical providers received almost $600 million total, while worker payments were about $275 million). Under current law, Judges review and approve all compromises, which serves to protect the interests of workers, medical providers, and group health carriers.  The Judges make sure the bills are satisfied.  Logic dictates that private settlements mean more claims will be closed—cost-shifting to medical providers.  Insurers will attempt to settle claims early and for smaller sums of money (like in civil litigation).  More closed claims means that medical bills and treatment that would have been covered within the 12 year statute of limitations by a worker’s compensation insurance company will now be shifted to the worker’s health insurance or none at all.  Thus, medical providers will be accepting lower Medicaid/Medicare reimbursement rates for charges that should have been under worker’s compensation.

 5) Cost-shifting of worker’s compensation system to taxpayers, via Medicaid/Medicare. 

Just as the above, with the allowance for private settlements, we will see an exponential increase in claims being closed sooner than in the past.   A closed claim immediately shifts the costs for future medical care to the worker’s own health insurance, including Medicaid and Medicare.  There is no denying an increase in taxpayer-funded health care costs if the current proposal moves forward.

ACTION IS REQUIRED.  Why “fix” a nationally-recognized system that is not broken?  If you favor the continuation of Wisconsin’s worker’s compensation system, contact your Wisconsin legislators now.

Senator_Tom_Harkin.jpg

Protecting Workers from being Destroyed by the Work Schedule

Senator Tom Harkin

I wrote the post below as an editorial in the Iowa City Press-Citizen. Because The Scheudles That Work Act is of national importance I want to make sure this issue receives the attention that it deserves by promoting awareness of it as broadly as possible. I hope you’ll take the time to read my editorial and pass it along to concerned citizens in your area.

Workers deserve some certainty in their work schedules. Why? Because we all have need to plan for child care, time for school, transportation, or simply time to pay bills and manage the household. It’s basic fairness.

But don’t you, a friend or an acquaintance work a job with unpredictable and irregular work schedules? You’ve probably noticed that irregular and on-call scheduling are increasingly common. It’s especially common in the fastest-growing areas of our economy—- cleaning, janitorial, retail and restaurant work.

These scheduling practices can devastate the worker and her/his family. The practices demand the worker choose between his job or his family. They often lead to the worker being fired.

Vermont and San Francisco have already passed laws to help employers and workers avoid this devastation.

Senator Tom Harkin has now proposed The Schedules That Work Act to help workers balancework duties with family duties. The Act helps both workers and employers by:

  • Protecting all employees from retaliation for requesting a more flexible, predictable or stable schedule.
  • Creating a process under which an employer considers a worker’s schedule request in a way that’s sensitive to the needs of the worker and her/his family. For example, schedule requests based on caregiving duties, health conditions, pursuing education or the need to meet the demands of a second job, must be granted, unless the employer has a good business reason for denying it.
  • Compensating retail, food service, and cleaning workers for at least four hours of work if an employee reports to work when scheduled for at least four hours but is sent home early.
  • Providing that retail, food service, and cleaning employees receive work schedules at least two weeks in advance. Though schedules may later be changed, one hour’s worth of extra pay is required for schedules changed with less than twenty-four (24) hours’ notice.
  • Providing workers an extra hour of pay if scheduled to work split shifts or non-consecutive shifts, within a single day.

Kudos to Senator Harkin! Some politicians and billionaire-driven PACs parrot “Iowa values” as a campaign slogan. Senator Harkin, on the contrary, uses those values to create legislation like the ADA and The Schedules That Work Act.

OSHA-Logo

Let OSHA Do Its Job

OSHA is being prevented from fulfilling its mission.

In 1970, Congress passed the Occupational Safety & Health Act (the Act), which created the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA). Among other things, the Act requires every employer to provide a safe workplace. To help employers reach this goal, OSHA promulgated hundreds of rules in the decade after it was created. OSHA’s rulemaking process has, however, slowed to a trickle since then.

While the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health recently identified over 600 toxic chemicals to which workers are exposed, in the last 16 years OSHA has added only two toxic chemicals to its list of regulated chemicals. This is because Congress, Presidents and the courts have hamstrung OSHA. For example, in March 2001 the Bush Administration and a Republican Congress effectively abolished OSHA’s ergonomics rule, a rule the agency had worked on for many years.

These delays and inactions have caused more than 100,000 avoidable workplace injuries and illnesses.

These delays and inactions have caused more than 100,000 avoidable workplace injuries and illnesses. Workers are being injured and killed by known hazardous circumstances and OSHA can’t act.

Congress and the President need to break this logjam – we need to free OSHA to do its job of safeguarding workers.

caregiver1

Injuries to In-Home Care Providers: Compensable?

Today’s post comes from guest author Charlie Domer from The Domer Law Firm.

A growing segment of the workforce involves individuals providing in-home medical care and assistance to private individuals. The assistance can range from a few hours per day, to 24/7 medical and domestic care for incapacitated individuals.

If the in-home care provider gets hurt while performing work duties, does this entitle the care provider to worker’s compensation benefits?

In a previous blog post, we discussed nannies, baby-sitters and domestic servants. “Home care providers” are treated differently (though an argument could be made that the care recipients from a nanny or from an in-home care provider are equally dependent — a baby and an elderly individual often have similar needs). The Commission held that persons providing personal/medical care to an “invalid” are not domestic servants (and thus, not statutorily exempt from the Act’s coverage). (Ambrose v. Harley Vandeveer Family Trust, WC Claim No. 86-39393 (LIRC Feb. 28, 1989); Winkler v. Vivian Smith, WC. Claim No. 1998059089 (LIRC Jun 29, 2000))

The Department generally considers that persons hired in a private home to give primary care to an individual whose duties involve assisting  in walking, bathing, preparing meals and special diets, supervising use of medications and exercise therapy and other duties commonly associated with the meaning of primary-care giver, meet the definition of home-care provider.

 If the domestic servant exemption does not apply, the question is: are home care providers to be considered as employees of the cared-for individual?

Interestingly, another statutory exception which may apply involves that of the cared-for individuals enterprise, as the person providing personal/medical care does not perform these services as part of the trade, business, occupation or profession of the cared-for individual (102.07(4)(a)2). Since the cared-for individual is not in the business of providing in-home care, there would be no worker’s compensation coverage, unless the cared-for individual elects to award these. Thus, the Department, based on this statutory exception, suggests that no employer-employee relationship exists under the Act.

As the Commission has left this issue largely undecided in the case of a private cared-for individual hiring their care provider, arguments exist both for and against coverage. Alternatively, if a county referred the home care provider to the individual and the county set the provider’s rate of pay, the county is the employer for worker’s compensation purposes. (See Cobb v. County of Barron, WC Claim No. 2006-043003 (LIRC Dec. 11, 2008); Nickell v. Kewaunee County, WC Claim No. 94064155 (LIRC Sept. 24, 1996)).

 

NIOSH_Latex_Facts

NIOSH Acts To Prevent Lifting Injuries For Home Healthcare Workers

Today’s post comes to us from our colleague Jon Gelman from New Jersey.

The National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH has published educational information to prevent musculoskeletal injuries at work. Injuries caused by ergonomic factors have been a major issue of the Federal government for decades and have been the basis for repetitive trauma motion claims for workers’ compensation benefits. While the Clinton-Democratic administration had advocated strongly for ergonomic regulations, the Bush-Republican administration took action to reject the reporting of ergonomic injuries to OSHA.

A work-related musculoskeletal disorder is an injury of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, joints, cartilage, bones, or blood vessels in the arms, legs, head, neck, or back that is caused or aggravated by work tasks such as lifting, pushing, and pulling. Symptoms include pain, stiffness, swelling, numbness, and tingling.

Lifting and moving clients create a high risk for back injury and other musculoskeletal disorders for home healthcare workers. Continue reading