Fear of Ebola Breeds a Terror of Physicians

Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from www.nytimes.com

Healthcare professional face serious and fatal virus infections overseas. The conditions contrated within the course of thier employment may be deemed compensble under the Workers’ Compensation even though they extra-jurisdiction exposures. Today’s post is share from nytimes.com

Eight youths, some armed with slingshots and machetes, stood warily alongside a rutted dirt road at an opening in the high reeds, the path to the village of Kolo Bengou. The deadly Ebola virus is believed to have infected several people in the village, and the youths were blocking the path to prevent health workers from entering.

“We don’t want any visitors,” said their leader, Faya Iroundouno, 17, president of Kolo Bengou’s youth league. “We don’t want any contact with anyone.” The others nodded in agreement and fiddled with their slingshots.

Singling out the international aid group Doctors Without Borders, Mr. Iroundouno continued, “Wherever those people have passed, the communities have been hit by illness.”

Health workers here say they are now battling two enemies: the unprecedented Ebola epidemic, which has killed more than 660 people in four countries since it was first detected in March, and fear, which has produced growing hostility toward outside help. On Friday alone, health authorities in Guinea confirmed 14 new cases of the disease.

Workers and officials, blamed by panicked populations for spreading the virus, have been…

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Former Millville student contracted herpes after relationship with teacher, lawsuit states

Today’s post was shared by The Workers’ Injury Law & Advocacy Group and comes from www.nj.com

Michael S. Drebes 

MILLVILLE — A former high school student filed a lawsuit against the Millville Board of Education earlier this month for not properly supervising a teacher who conducted an inappropriate and illegal sexual relationship with her, according to the lawsuit.

Meagan Jones, 20, the former student, also named Michael S. Drebes, 42, her former math teacher that she was in a sexual relationship with, in the lawsuit for mental and physical injuries — including contracting herpes from Drebes.

In addition, the lawsuit, which was filed on July 3 with Cumberland County Superior Court, names former principal Albert B. Johnson and student assistance counsel Steven Megonigal as defendants.

She requests $450,000 in damages for "various and diverse physical and mental injuries," including anxiety and medical expenses in excess of $3,600, the lawsuit states.

Jones was 14 at the time and a ninth-grade student at Millville Memorial High School when Drebes began pursing a sexual relationship with her, according to the lawsuit.

The relationship lasted from February 2009 until shortly before his arrest in June 2009.

The Millville Board of Education, Johnson and Megonigal are named as defendants, according to the lawsuit, for negligence in hiring Drebes, failure to investigate the relationship, failure to supervise Drebes and failure to enforce written policies on electronic communication between teachers and students.

"I can’t comment on…

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Alabama man had penis mistakenly amputated during circumcision: lawsuit

Today’s post was shared by The Workers’ Injury Law & Advocacy Group and comes from www.nydailynews.com

The Princeton Baptist Medical Center in Birmingham, Alabama was the scene of the alleged botched operation.
The Princeton Baptist Medical Center in Birmingham, Alabama was the scene of the alleged botched operation.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — An Alabama man who went into surgery for what was supposed to be a routine circumcision filed a lawsuit contending doctors mistakenly amputated his penis, but a hospital said Thursday the claims were without merit.

The lawsuit, filed in state court on Tuesday, says Johnny Lee Banks Jr. went to Princeton Baptist Medical Center last month for a circumcision that went horribly wrong.

Banks’ penis was gone when he awoke after surgery, according to the suit, yet no one ever warned that amputation could result from the procedure.

Banks and his wife, Zelda Banks, are seeking an unspecified amount of money in the complaint. The suit accuses the defendants of medical malpractice, negligence and other wrongdoing.

A statement released by hospital spokeswoman Kate Darden said the allegations lacked merit.

“We intend to defend all counts aggressively,” said the statement from Baptist Health System Inc., which operates the hospital in Birmingham. The hospital declined further comment.

The suit also names Urology Centers of Alabama and Dr. Vincent Michael Bivins, who works there; and Simon-Williamson Clinic and Dr. Alan C. Aikens, who works at the clinic.

Representatives from neither business nor the doctors returned messages seeking comment.

Bivins was treating Banks for conditions that led to the circumcision, the suit says, and Aikens was…

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Report: Number Of Ground Zero Cancer Cases Skyrocketing

Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from newyork.cbslocal.com

Firefighters make their way through rubble and debris after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001. (Credit: Getty Images)
Firefighters make their way through rubble and debris after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001. (Credit: Getty Images)

Firefighters make their way through rubble and debris after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001. (Credit: Getty Images)

CBS New York (con’t)

Affordable Care Act Updates: CBSNewYork.com/ACA

Health News & Information: CBSNewYork.com/Health

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There has been a dramatic increase in the number of 9/11 rescuers and responders with cancer in the past year, according to a published report.

The New York Post says that Mount Sinai Hospital’s World Trade Center Health Program reported 1,140 cancer cases last year. Now the number is up to more than 2,500.

1339505 8 Report: Number Of Ground Zero Cancer Cases Skyrocketing
Report: Number Of Ground Zero Cancer Cases Skyrocketing

Among the cancers being diagnosed at a much higher rate than the general population: prostate cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia and multiple myeloma.

The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund is expected to receive more claims by the Oct. 14 deadline. So far, there are 1,145 claims listing cancer.

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IRS prepping for Obamacare employer mandate in 2015

An Affordable Care Act pamphlet is pictured. | AP Photo

Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from www.politico.com

What will happen with the employer mandate? Will the consequences be that the workers’ compensation carriers expand coverage to employer based policies that are cheaper than traditional workers’ compenaation policies. Today’s post is shared from Politico.com

The Obama administration signaled Thursday it’s not backing down from the controversial health law employer mandate that has been delayed twice and is the centerpiece of the House’s lawsuit against the president.

The IRS posted drafts of the forms that employers will have to fill out to comply with the Obamacare requirement that employers provide health insurance to workers.

Some business groups said the information was still too tentative and too incomplete to let them prepare for new obligations under the health law. “Our immense frustrations with the IRS continue,” Christine Pollack, vice president of Government Affairs at the Retail Industry Leaders Association, said in a statement.

An administration official said the White House is sticking to the timeline announced earlier this year. Companies with 50 to 99 employees will have another year — until 2016 — to start the coverage. Companies with 100 or more employees do have to comply next year, although they have two years to phase up so that they are covering 95 percent of their workers. Smaller businesses are exempt.

The House Republicans are planning to sue President Barack Obama, saying he overstepped his authority in…

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City of Charlotte settles lawsuit over police shooting for $115,000

Today’s post was shared by The Workers’ Injury Law & Advocacy Group and comes from www.charlotteobserver.com

More Information

  • Joint statement in police shooting lawsuit

    “In the late evening hours of October 16, 2010, Officer Matthew Wilson shot and injured Jeffery Green. It is now clear that Officer Wilson was dispatched to investigate the stabbing of Mrs. Valinda Streater, Jeffery Green’s mother. Upon arrival, Officer Wilson observed that Mrs. Streater had just been stabbed and that her injuries were serious. It is also clear that Officer Wilson received information that Mrs. Streater’s parents might have been in danger.

    Based on that information, Officer Wilson correctly decided to check on their wellbeing. In addition, it is now clear that Jeffery Green, upon hearing that his mother had been stabbed, picked up a kitchen knife to defend his mother from further harm and started walking towards the location of his mother and Officer Wilson.

    Unfortunately, Jeffery Green was walking down a dark street and headed directly towards Officer Wilson. Officer Wilson, believing that Jeffery Green might have been the suspect who had stabbed Mrs. Streater, ordered Jeffery Green to drop the knife just prior to making the decision to shoot Jeffery Green. Officer Wilson did not learn until after the incident that Jeffery Green was not the person who stabbed and severely injured his mother.

    While the City believes that Officer Wilson’s decision to shoot Jeffery Green was reasonable under the conditions confronting Officer Wilson that night, the City also recognizes…

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Amazon faces federal lawsuit over charges racked up by children playing app games

Today’s post was shared by The Workers’ Injury Law & Advocacy Group and comes from www.oregonlive.com

kindle.jpg

The Kindle Fire, Amazon’s first color tablet computer, is at the heart of a lawsuit filed by the Federal Trade Commission. The federal agency accuses Amazon of charging account-holders for charges racked up unknowingly by children. (The Associated Press)

The Federal Trade Commission has accused Amazon.com of billing its customers for millions of dollars in charges racked up unknowingly by children.

The FTC filed a lawsuit on Thursday against Amazon.com Inc., seeking to require refunds for parents and other account-holders and to ban the practice in the future.

Wrongly charged for in-app games?

The Federal Trade Commission encourages Amazon customers who believe they’ve been wrongly charged for fees racked up by children to file a complaint. Lodge your complaint online or by calling 1-877-382-4357.

An Amazon did not immediately return a call or email for comment.

Parents or other account-holders who believe they may qualify for a refund should file a complaint with the FTC.

A number of tech companies, including Apple Inc., have faced this issue with applications they sell and the devices that run them. The problem arises when children play application-based games, which offer extras or bonus features for a fee. Consumer groups say young people aren’t always aware how quickly costs can add up for extras such as "coins," "stars," and "acorns."

Companies that create the games typically keep most of the money. However,…

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Patient Access To Physicians Notes: An Experiment of Psychological Importance

Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from well.blogs.nytimes.com

Photo Today’s post is shared from the NYTimes.com  What would happen if all workers’ compensation patients had access to all their treating physician’s records including pschiatric care? Would such access assist in limiting and increasing litigation for continued medical care and the need for medical treatment?

David Baldwin wasn’t sure how he had come across the other day in group therapy at the hospital, near the co-op apartment where he lives with his rescue cat, Zoey. He struggles with bipolar disorder, severe anxiety and depression. Like so many patients, he secretly wondered what his therapist thought of him.

But unlike those patients, Mr. Baldwin, 64, was able to find out, swiftly and privately. Pulling his black leather swivel chair to his desk, he logged onto a hospital website and eagerly perused his therapist’s session notes.

The clinical social worker, Stephen O’Neill, wrote that Mr. Baldwin’s self-consciousness about his disorder kept him isolated. Because he longed to connect with others, this was particularly self-defeating, Mr. O’Neill observed. But during the session, he had also discussed how he had helped out neighbors in his co-op.

“This seems greatly appreciated, and he noted his clear enjoyment in helping others,” Mr. O’Neill wrote. “This greatly assists his self-esteem.”

A smile animated Mr. Baldwin’s broad, amiable features. “I have a tough time recognizing that…

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